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 FAQs

Does EMI calibrate all measuring gages?
No. There are many things that we do not calibrate at EMI. We cannot possibly measure every gage the country needs and limitations on space and equipment forces us to choose calibrations we think will do the most good for the most industries, which changes slowly over time in response to customer feedback. We send a response card with every calibration and attend professional meetings our customers attend to get a better feel for what we should be calibrating. So, if you do not see what you need in our list of services, contact us immediately. If we have the equipment, we can sometimes do the calibration as a Special Test. If enough people contact us about performing certain calibrations, we can go up our chain of command and argue for the resources to add the calibration to our offerings.

Look at the answer to the next question for more advice.

If EMI cannot calibrate an artifact, where else can I go for help?

Please conduct us. Other sources of information on metrology laboratories are the ADQCC-Quality Infrastructure Service Sector, ENAS (Emirates National Accreditation System), and DAC (Dubai Accreditation Center).

These bodies have a database of laboratories that can be searched. The laboratory scope of accreditation is available, so you can see if they do the calibration you need.

Where do I send artifacts and items?
Emirates Metrology Institute mailing and shipping address:

EMI (Emirates Metrology Institute)
881 Muroor Street, Abu Dhabi,
HCT-CERT Area, Block H,
Po Box: 853

Notice: All artifacts and items should be properly packed to prevent damage during shipment. Steel artifacts should be protected with a rust-inhibiting substance or material. All shipping containers will be reused to return items.

When was the EMI establish?
​Emirates Metrology Institute is one of the Abu Dhabi Quality and Conformity sectors (QCC), which was established in accordance with Local Law No. (3) of 2009

What is the official EMI Number on my report?
​The official number that EMI uses to keep track of reports, is a long number containing the letter for the Laboratory performing the service, the number the EMI Calibration Program Office generates, and the year the service is performed. This number should be on every page of the report. 

Why these EMI calibration fees?
​Our fees are higher compared to commercial calibration labs, but the EMI uncertainty is smaller. The cost versus uncertainty curve gets fairly steep for very low uncertainties. The fair competition principles as well as the high cost of maintenance of National Standards was taken into account, however effort was given in order the fees to remain as low as possible.

How do I get the uncertainty of my calibrations?
Consult us.

NIST uses the comprehensive International Organization for Standardization (ISO) "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement," or GUM, which is available for purchase, to calculate our uncertainties.

There are simpler introductions to the concepts available on the web sites for NIST and the National Physical Laboratory in England (NPL).

The basic task in getting the uncertainty for a measurement is to list all of the sources of uncertainty; this list is called an uncertainty budget. There are two basic types of sources, those that are sampled repeatedly, i.e., are measured by the repeatability of the measurement and represented by the standard deviation, and those that are not. Those that are not require an informed estimate (guess). The trick is that if we are all to have uncertainties on the same scale, we must all guess it about the same way.

How can I get a training in metrology?
​Contact Customer Support Department of EMI

Does EMI “certify” instruments or artifacts? Does EMI report an artifact out of tolerance?
​We usually simply report the result of a measurement and our customers are responsible for deciding conformance with specifications or standards. Compliance to specific standards could be provided after request.

How often must I recalibrate an instrument or artifact?
​You need to calibrate often enough that the instrument or artifact is known well enough that the quality of your product is not adversely affected. You must know what uncertainty you require of the instrument or artifact and you need to know how the calibration is expected to change with time. Most systems for setting calibration intervals assume that the calibration slowly drifts over time, or that the change is at least describable by some reasonable statistical distribution. A good reference for these types of calculations is the ILAC-G24/OIML-D10 document titled: "Guidelines for the determination of calibration intervals of measuring instruments".

You must remember that when an instrument comes in for calibration, if it is seriously out of calibration you must suspect the judgements made on the basis of data from this instrument. This may involve recalling parts or other instruments for rechecks. Thus, it is a bad practice, economically, to set recalibration intervals that are too long. On the other hand, if every instrument is in calibration when checked, the intervals may be too short, at least in the sense that you are paying for unneeded calibrations. 

Where do I find information about EMI Calibration Services?
Calibration services, costs, and technical staff contacts are updated and can be  in the EMI website:

For calibration of non-standard items, contact EMI Customer Support Services. It will often be necessary to provide drawings with a detailed description of what you want measured and desired uncertainties and to contact EMI technical staff by telephone or e-mail.

Does traceability to foreign national labs, imply traceability to EMI?
​EMI. has many written agreements with foreign countries recognizing that, at the national laboratory level, we have the same units. For information and reference about international agreements between EMI and foreign agencies and organizations, visit the EMI web site. In addition to many bilateral agreements, EMI signed a multilateral Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) through which most of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMI) recognize each other's measurements. For information and reference about the MRA, visit the Bureau of Weights and Measures (Bureau Intérnational des Poids et Mésures, BIPM) web site.

In most countries, traceability is defined and interpreted by a government accreditation agency, and these agencies then work toward reciprocity with other countries accreditation agencies. There is a laboratory accreditation body (ABs) in UAE that is signatory to the international agreement (ILAC MRA). The Signatories to the ILAC Mutual Recognition Arrangement are listed on the ILAC website. The MRA basically assures you that a certificate from a lab that is accredited by one AB is acceptable to all of the other ABs that are signatories.

What should I use to clean my artifacts, such as, weights or gage blocks?
​We use mineral spirits for gage blocks that are really greasy, and ethanol as the final cleaner for gage blocks and weights. We do not use ultrasonic cleaners because both of these solvents are flammable and we would need special hoods and other equipment for safety reasons. We do not use methanol because it is a poison.

Can I visit EMI?
​Of course, you can visit EMI. Please make an appointment for a visit. Because of security reasons, you cannot show up without notice.

How should I calibrate my measuring instrument?
​We have no idea, unless you contact us and provide all necessary details. EMI consultancy expertise could be used for to support you solving metrological problems. 

Does EMI calibrate all measuring gages?
No. There are many things that we do not calibrate at EMI. We cannot possibly measure every gage the country needs and limitations on space and equipment forces us to choose calibrations we think will do the most good for the most industries, which changes slowly over time in response to customer feedback. We send a response card with every calibration and attend professional meetings our customers attend to get a better feel for what we should be calibrating. So, if you do not see what you need in our list of services, contact us immediately. If we have the equipment, we can sometimes do the calibration as a Special Test. If enough people contact us about performing certain calibrations, we can go up our chain of command and argue for the resources to add the calibration to our offerings.

Look at the answer to the next question for more advice.

If EMI cannot calibrate an artifact, where else can I go for help?

Please conduct us. Other sources of information on metrology laboratories are the ADQCC-Quality Infrastructure Service Sector, ENAS (Emirates National Accreditation System), and DAC (Dubai Accreditation Center).

These bodies have a database of laboratories that can be searched. The laboratory scope of accreditation is available, so you can see if they do the calibration you need.

Why these EMI calibration fees?
​Our fees are higher compared to commercial calibration labs, but the EMI uncertainty is smaller. The cost versus uncertainty curve gets fairly steep for very low uncertainties. The fair competition principles as well as the high cost of maintenance of National Standards was taken into account, however effort was given in order the fees to remain as low as possible.

Does traceability to foreign national labs, imply traceability to EMI?
​EMI. has many written agreements with foreign countries recognizing that, at the national laboratory level, we have the same units. For information and reference about international agreements between EMI and foreign agencies and organizations, visit the EMI web site. In addition to many bilateral agreements, EMI signed a multilateral Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) through which most of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMI) recognize each other's measurements. For information and reference about the MRA, visit the Bureau of Weights and Measures (Bureau Intérnational des Poids et Mésures, BIPM) web site.

In most countries, traceability is defined and interpreted by a government accreditation agency, and these agencies then work toward reciprocity with other countries accreditation agencies. There is a laboratory accreditation body (ABs) in UAE that is signatory to the international agreement (ILAC MRA). The Signatories to the ILAC Mutual Recognition Arrangement are listed on the ILAC website. The MRA basically assures you that a certificate from a lab that is accredited by one AB is acceptable to all of the other ABs that are signatories.

How do I get the uncertainty of my calibrations?
Consult us.

NIST uses the comprehensive International Organization for Standardization (ISO) "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement," or GUM, which is available for purchase, to calculate our uncertainties.

There are simpler introductions to the concepts available on the web sites for NIST and the National Physical Laboratory in England (NPL).

The basic task in getting the uncertainty for a measurement is to list all of the sources of uncertainty; this list is called an uncertainty budget. There are two basic types of sources, those that are sampled repeatedly, i.e., are measured by the repeatability of the measurement and represented by the standard deviation, and those that are not. Those that are not require an informed estimate (guess). The trick is that if we are all to have uncertainties on the same scale, we must all guess it about the same way.

Can I visit EMI?
​Of course, you can visit EMI. Please make an appointment for a visit. Because of security reasons, you cannot show up without notice.

What should I use to clean my artifacts, such as, weights or gage blocks?
​We use mineral spirits for gage blocks that are really greasy, and ethanol as the final cleaner for gage blocks and weights. We do not use ultrasonic cleaners because both of these solvents are flammable and we would need special hoods and other equipment for safety reasons. We do not use methanol because it is a poison.

What is the official EMI Number on my report?
​The official number that EMI uses to keep track of reports, is a long number containing the letter for the Laboratory performing the service, the number the EMI Calibration Program Office generates, and the year the service is performed. This number should be on every page of the report. 

Does EMI “certify” instruments or artifacts? Does EMI report an artifact out of tolerance?
​We usually simply report the result of a measurement and our customers are responsible for deciding conformance with specifications or standards. Compliance to specific standards could be provided after request.

When was the EMI establish?
​Emirates Metrology Institute is one of the Abu Dhabi Quality and Conformity sectors (QCC), which was established in accordance with Local Law No. (3) of 2009

Where do I find information about EMI Calibration Services?
Calibration services, costs, and technical staff contacts are updated and can be  in the EMI website:

For calibration of non-standard items, contact EMI Customer Support Services. It will often be necessary to provide drawings with a detailed description of what you want measured and desired uncertainties and to contact EMI technical staff by telephone or e-mail.

How can I get a training in metrology?
​Contact Customer Support Department of EMI

How often must I recalibrate an instrument or artifact?
​You need to calibrate often enough that the instrument or artifact is known well enough that the quality of your product is not adversely affected. You must know what uncertainty you require of the instrument or artifact and you need to know how the calibration is expected to change with time. Most systems for setting calibration intervals assume that the calibration slowly drifts over time, or that the change is at least describable by some reasonable statistical distribution. A good reference for these types of calculations is the ILAC-G24/OIML-D10 document titled: "Guidelines for the determination of calibration intervals of measuring instruments".

You must remember that when an instrument comes in for calibration, if it is seriously out of calibration you must suspect the judgements made on the basis of data from this instrument. This may involve recalling parts or other instruments for rechecks. Thus, it is a bad practice, economically, to set recalibration intervals that are too long. On the other hand, if every instrument is in calibration when checked, the intervals may be too short, at least in the sense that you are paying for unneeded calibrations. 

Where do I send artifacts and items?
Emirates Metrology Institute mailing and shipping address:

EMI (Emirates Metrology Institute)
881 Muroor Street, Abu Dhabi,
HCT-CERT Area, Block H,
Po Box: 853

Notice: All artifacts and items should be properly packed to prevent damage during shipment. Steel artifacts should be protected with a rust-inhibiting substance or material. All shipping containers will be reused to return items.

How should I calibrate my measuring instrument?
​We have no idea, unless you contact us and provide all necessary details. EMI consultancy expertise could be used for to support you solving metrological problems.